Panel providers, unite – the speech at the ASC

On the 9th of November, the ASC invited some panel providers to attend a discussion on panel harmonisation. The discussion was orchestrated by Tim Macer.

Here was my speech – the written version at least as I may have ad-libbed a few unscripted things.

ASCPanel

Market Research is changing. You have heard it a million times – not in the way that Ray Pointer announced. There will be more surveys in 10 years than ever. That’s the good news. The bad news is that most of them won’t be run by MR institutes. The goose with the golden eggs is dead – client now run their own surveys which means MR companies – just to stay in business – have to be more competitive.

Goose with the golden eggs (before / after)

before-after

They started to delocalise in India, in Romania or in Ukraine. But that was not enough. To save more money, they have started to use automation.

This has its advantages – of course the surveys were a little bit more formatted… but Millward Brown had done that successfully for years. But once the bugs are eradicated, it’s efficient, fast and most of all cheap. And no blockade by disgruntled employees – although that’s more a French problem.

PresentationBrands

The problem is that end-clients are following up the trend – they can do automation too! They are using Zappi Store and Wizer… and SurveyMonkey and SurveyGizmo and ConfirmIt (and Askia). And ToLuna. And SSI self-serve. And Lucid. And Cint.

I have mentioned it at the ASC’s last conference: we have entered a golden age. The age of the API. A golden age for geeks like me at least: the internet is changing into a gigantic API where information is exchanged through web services. Everything is interconnected and uses the same interfaces.

IoT

I do not know if any of you have used IFTTT – If This Then That. It’s an app where you define a condition and an action. If I get near the house, put the lights on. If the temperature gets below 17 at night, put the heating on. If I enter the kitchen in the morning, put the radio on and start the coffee machine. If I have no milk in the fridge, order some. The IoT – the internet of things – is happening through one common interface through web services… and all industries are playing ball because they want their share of that big cake of a connected world.

oil-rig

I know we all have panel providers on stage so they might disagree with me. But panel data is no longer the only oil on planet Research. Customer databases are increasingly used because they can be energised by communities. And there is all sort of big data available at large – aggregated or not. It could be a loyalty card data, www foot prints or mobile phone data.

wine-glass

And just like for a good Bordeaux wine, to get quality you need to master the art of Blend. The merlot a bit dry and earthy – that will be your panel data. There is some cheap Merlot and very good Merlot too. And the Cabernet Sauvignon with its fruity flavours – that will be your behavioural data.

But unlike the IoT industry, Market Research providers have not decided to play ball. There are the ones who do not facilitate automation because they are afraid of losing control and burning panel. And there are the ones who do but work in isolation.

I do not believe there can be one company that will fill all the needs in Panel data. ToLuna is posturing itself as a one stop for all MR needs: the software, the panel and the behaviour. SSI is doing something similar and the merge with ResearchNow is going to be very interesting. The Leonard Murphy analysis about that on GreenBlog was great btw. And it won’t be scraps left for the others – because the need for data is growing – the need for specialised quality data will be growing too.

babel

But we need a common language. A common grammar. What is a social grade? How do I define national representativity? And how do I trigger a soft launch? How do I notify that a quota is full?

But there is another side to this discussion. If we let anyone access a survey which is tedious, long, repetitive, with grids, 2 max-diff exercises and one 20 minute trade-off, how do we reward the dedicated weirdos that filled that nightmare of a survey? How do we warn them that they are in for the long run? Because we might lose another goose with golden eggs. How can we stop the cull of panellists and the ever drop in response rates?

tediousness

I suggest we build metrics: number of questions, number of responses in a question. And then number of words per question, number of similar questions, number of mandatory open-ended questions… and then build a model.

$(Survey) => (Length(Survey) x TotalTediousness(Survey))-1

And then remunerate the panellists (and their providers) accordingly.

While I was preparing this discussion with all of you, most of you mentioned of how slow moving our industry was. It’s not just that: it’s protective, short-sighted and technologically unaware. And that’s everything the ASC is not. It’s at the ASC that triple-S, a format to exchange survey data between competing survey software was created and promoted. It’s two of my competitors, Steve Jenkins and Keith Hughes, who patiently showed my errors and taught me how to write a proper triple-S file. Let’s all be a little bit more like them and a little bit less like Apple who introduces a new plug and a new format with each new version.

chinese-propaganda

That’s my manifesto – a call for arms… please discuss and let’s move it forward.

Richard Collins becomes Askia’s first Chief Customer Officer

In this board-level role, Richard will manage and develop Askia’s international client base, as well as take overall responsibility for Askia UK office.

Richard Collins

Richard (pictured above) has built a unique track record in the Market Research industry playing key roles in leading companies. Most recently he was Chief Customer Officer for Big Sofa Technologies and before that he founded the first international office for Decipher Inc. in London (known as Decrypt and acquired by FocusVision). Prior to that, he has also held senior positions with Confirmit, Pulse Train and SPSS/IBM.

Patrick George-Lassale, Askia CEO, comments:  It’s the perfect fit at the perfect time! We are ready to take our global business development to the next level. Richard has inspiring skills and experience and we share the same values: we simply had to work together.”

Richard adds:  “It is an extremely exciting time to be joining Askia. We have some important announcements that we are preparing to share over the coming months that will see the company change significantly: both from an organisational and a technological point of view.”

Stay tuned for further details.

MaxDiff grows!

This article provides an in-depth explanation of AskiaDesign‘s built-in capacity to manage MaxDiff data collection & analysis methodologies. For those of you who, like me, need a short reminder of what MaxDiff is; this is the definition provided by Wikipedia:

The MaxDiff is a long-established academic mathematical theory with very specific assumptions about how people make choices: it assumes that respondents evaluate all possible pairs of items within the displayed set and choose the pair that reflects the maximum difference in preference or importance. It may be thought of as a variation of the method of Paired Comparisons. Consider a set in which a respondent evaluates four items: A, B, C and D. If the respondent says that A is best and D is worst, these two responses inform us on five of six possible implied paired comparisons:

A > B,  A > C,  A > D, B > D, C > D

The only paired comparison that cannot be inferred is B vs. C. In a choice among five items, MaxDiff questioning informs on seven of ten implied paired comparisons.

MaxDiff table

We have recently added a new ADC to our offering that allows you to easily create MaxDiff tables in AskiaDesign. This article covers the setup process and usage for such comparison tables:

MaxDiff table ADC

 

This Askia Design Control allows you to easily create the required screen format for MaxDiff surveys. Add the ADC to your resources, drag it on to your Most response block, set any captions you want to appear in the headers of your grid and select the Least question it should be connected to. As with most ADCs, this survey control allows you to customise many parameters, such as:

  • Least Question: when you drag the ADC on to the response block for your ‘Most’ question, this is where you define which ‘Least’ question it relates to.
  • Most Caption: the caption you want to appear in the ‘Most’ column header.
  • Least Caption: the caption you want to appear in the ‘Least’ column header.
  • Centre Caption: the caption you want to appear in the centre column header e.g. this can be information about the loop iteration or screen number.

You can play around with this survey control in the following demos:

Alternatively, you can download (or even contribute) the MaxDiff ADC from Github!

MaxDiff interactive library

When conducting MaxDiff methodology you have a number of different parameters to consider and produce programming instructions for. At Askia, we have used the R software environment to do this for the different parameters and a large range of the options for each. We have created an interactive library in Design which asks you what option you want for each parameter. The result is a greatly simplified process for producing any MaxDiff design with Askia.

The available parameters are:

  • Number of questions: also known as the number of arrangements or number of screens. This is the number of screens the respondent will see during the course of the MaxDiff section.
  • Number of selectable items: this is the number of options to choose between per screen.
  • Number of items: this is the number of attributes or statements you want to include overall in the MaxDiff design.

As from version 5.4.6 of AskiaDesign, you can now use our Interactive Library feature to easily create and setup your MaxDiff design with the help of the above parameters:

MaxDiff interactive library

 

Check out the full article for more in-depth information & resources.

Adaptive MaxDiff

As we have seen in the above, the key point with standard MaxDiff is that the arrangements on screen are pre-set and do not adapt to the responses given in interview. In addition, the number of selectable options on screen is a constant.

However, in adaptive MaxDiff, the number of selectable options will change. Each round of screens, the items selected as Least are removed from the next round of screens. The number of items on screens therefore diminishes until you get to the start of the last round where you are asked to pick between all those you chose as Most.

The advantages of adaptive MaxDiff are that greater discrimination between items of importance is achieved. The disadvantages? Well, it could be argued that, since your initial answers create the upcoming arrangements, you do not have as much opportunity to change your mind about items you have rated least important in previous rounds.

This article details these differences, provides an example questionnaire to showcase the setup of this methodology with Askia as well as instructions on using and updating the example file for your own list of items.